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AMORI DIVINI

year
2017
place
MANN – MUSEO ARCHEOLOGICO NAZIONALE DI NAPOLI (NA)
program
TEMPORARY EXHIBITION
surface
380 sqm
client
ELECTA - MONDADORI
architects
stARTT
team
Andrea Valentini, Fabio Coletta, Cecilia Rosa, Vittoria Stefanini, Lidia Angelini, Laura Fassio
curators
Anna Anguissola, Carmela Capaldi, Valeria Sampaolo, Luigi Gallo
graphic identity
Tassinari/Vetta
suppliers
Rosario Petrucci s.r.l.
photography
Gabriele Lungarella
design phase
REALIZED
The project exposes, in the spaces of MANN, the National Archaeological Museum of Naples, about 80 works of the Greek-Roman classic era and their modern reinterpretations, depicting the myths of transformation of the Metamorphoses of Ovid.

The layout is inspired by the narrative structure of the text, where every myth is introduced by the previous myth; sometimes by content analogy, sometimes by form identity, sometimes transforming the narrated subject into the narrator. This sequence of the story, like a "box in the box", is translated into a spatial metaphor where the exhibition space is contained in the architectural shell of the museum halls: when the exhibition support is engraved, cropped or bent, the architecture that contains it is unveiled. The walls indicate by their own shape the visit direction suggesting the springer of a vault, which is contained by the larger pendentive dome of the museum's space. Vertical supports are engraved to house the pieces in display; cropped and folded to accommodate large-format paintings; engraved and overturned to indicate the presence of artwork of particular prestige and quality. Finally, the supports for free sculptures allude by their own shape to zoomorphic figures, in tune with the transformations of Zeus's loves.

The exhibition is designed to enhance the quality of the place: the dark colors of the vertical supports focus the attention on the restored floor mosaics from Pompeii and Herculaneum, which are re-unveiled to the public for the first time in decades.

The exhibition shows pieces from Magna Grecia and some of the most prestigious Italian and foreign museums (among others, the Hermitage of St. Petersburg, the Musée du Louvre in Paris, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna).